Free Legal Advice Philippines

Disclaimer: This web site is designed for general information only and does not create attorney-client relationship. Persons accessing this site are encouraged to seek independent counsel for legal advice regarding their individual legal issues.

Log in

I forgot my password




You are not connected. Please login or register

Corruption in the parctice of law and in the judiciary.

View previous topic View next topic Go down  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Ponente


Arresto Menor
I am a new lawyer, having passed the 2007 BAR. When I was still a law student, I was very excited and looking forward to bright things and challenges. One week after our signing, I immediately engaged in the private practice in a local law office. I consider myself very lucky to have case/s everyday. My work day starts at around 8:30 in the moring and usually it ends at the same time in the evening. After several months of private practice, it dawned unto me the extent of corruption in this country. I feel disappointed, to be honest. Most of my companeros say that it is still best to engage in the practice of law whether in private or in the govt, but for the moment, I think otherwise. I realized that being a lawyer here is a matter of survival, it is either you go along with the trend of coruption, otherwise you are fighting a lonely and desperate battle. Nakaka awa ang sistema dito sa atin.

As of this moment, I intend to try the corporate world. Maybe I will find more comfort in mercantile and taxation laws. Good luck to me in finding a new job.

respectfully soliciting your views/reactions to herein posted topic. Thanks.

View user profile

prettylaw


Arresto Mayor
thanks for sharing your experiences. I salute you for keeping your principles intact. It is very disheartening to hear that corruption is very rampant in the practice of law and in the judiciary.

Good luck for your search of a new career. maybe you can try applying at banks and other financial institutions Very Happy

View user profile
Hehehe. Dog eat dog ang system ng practice dito. most of the cases are decided not on the merits but on how the a litigant posses money, influence and connection. nakaka suka dahil you'll be working on your pleadings and researches only to find out later that your boss in the law firm had already made a deal with somebody in the prosec office or the courts just to have a favorable reso/decision. pagminsan it's the very lawfirm who will draft the reso/decision tapos pirma na lang si prosec/judge. Sabi nga nila " you can never go wrong when the price is right..right???"

Ako, parang gusto mag negosyo na lang...get a notarial commission para di naman maging sayang yung atty na title..then tigil na sa court practice.

View user profile

fbsensei


moderator
Hi guys, I share the experience. After 3 years of practicing I can't even imagine why i'm still doing this job. That's probably the reason why I ventured into the international trade practice, so I won't be dealing with this kind of crap everyday. But sometimes it can't be helped kasi naman maraming mga kaibigan na kailangan ng tulong.

View user profile

5 Everything is corrupt. on Mon Feb 09, 2009 5:34 pm

Ponente


Arresto Menor
Hindi lang mga tao and corrupt, pati facilities, corrupt din. It is a nightmare. Very true ang kanta ng Bamboo na Tatsulok.

View user profile

6 International trade practice. on Mon Feb 16, 2009 5:27 pm

Ponente


Arresto Menor
fbsensei, what exactly is international trade practice? Does this, more or less relate to commercial law practice?

View user profile

fbsensei


moderator
Yes, it's an area of commercial law, but i'm dealing with compliance with international trade laws of other jurisdictions, e.g. WTO, US customs, US export administration regulation, US ITAR, Wassennar Arrangement, etc.

View user profile

8 Thanks on Tue Feb 17, 2009 5:35 pm

Ponente


Arresto Menor
I see. You must be enjoying your work. thanks

View user profile

sheriff


Arresto Menor
admiral thrawn wrote:Hehehe. Dog eat dog ang system ng practice dito. most of the cases are decided not on the merits but on how the a litigant posses money, influence and connection. nakaka suka dahil you'll be working on your pleadings and researches only to find out later that your boss in the law firm had already made a deal with somebody in the prosec office or the courts just to have a favorable reso/decision. pagminsan it's the very lawfirm who will draft the reso/decision tapos pirma na lang si prosec/judge.

Sir, this is what the Alabang Boys' lawyer did when he himself drafted the resolution for the release of his clients

View user profile

sheriff


Arresto Menor
fbsensei wrote:Yes, it's an area of commercial law, but i'm dealing with compliance with international trade laws of other jurisdictions, e.g. WTO, US customs, US export administration regulation, US ITAR, Wassennar Arrangement, etc.

wow this is great sir. i hope the present financial crisis is not taking its toll on this kind of venture

View user profile

sheriff


Arresto Menor
Ponente wrote:I am a new lawyer, having passed the 2007 BAR. When I was still a law student, I was very excited and looking forward to bright things and challenges. One week after our signing, I immediately engaged in the private practice in a local law office. I consider myself very lucky to have case/s everyday. My work day starts at around 8:30 in the moring and usually it ends at the same time in the evening. After several months of private practice, it dawned unto me the extent of corruption in this country. I feel disappointed, to be honest. Most of my companeros say that it is still best to engage in the practice of law whether in private or in the govt, but for the moment, I think otherwise. I realized that being a lawyer here is a matter of survival, it is either you go along with the trend of coruption, otherwise you are fighting a lonely and desperate battle. Nakaka awa ang sistema dito sa atin.

As of this moment, I intend to try the corporate world. Maybe I will find more comfort in mercantile and taxation laws. Good luck to me in finding a new job.

respectfully soliciting your views/reactions to herein posted topic. Thanks.

good luck sir. i hope that you find a new job. maybe you can teach in a university for the meantime while looking for a job

View user profile

b_9904


Prision Correccional
Ponente wrote:I am a new lawyer, having passed the 2007 BAR. When I was still a law student, I was very excited and looking forward to bright things and challenges. One week after our signing, I immediately engaged in the private practice in a local law office. I consider myself very lucky to have case/s everyday. My work day starts at around 8:30 in the moring and usually it ends at the same time in the evening. After several months of private practice, it dawned unto me the extent of corruption in this country. I feel disappointed, to be honest. Most of my companeros say that it is still best to engage in the practice of law whether in private or in the govt, but for the moment, I think otherwise. I realized that being a lawyer here is a matter of survival, it is either you go along with the trend of coruption, otherwise you are fighting a lonely and desperate battle. Nakaka awa ang sistema dito sa atin.

As of this moment, I intend to try the corporate world. Maybe I will find more comfort in mercantile and taxation laws. Good luck to me in finding a new job.

respectfully soliciting your views/reactions to herein posted topic. Thanks.

Atty. Oposa fought a lot of lonely battles but nonetheless won two landmark cases in environmental law, namely: Oposa v. Factoran, Jr. and MMDA v. Citizen of Manila Bay.

He lost many of the public interest cases he filed but he kept on fighting.

He gave up his commercial law practice so that he could fight for his cause.

He gave up the royalty in one of his book so that people could read about the dire situation of our environment.

He fought against corruption, apathy, and a lot of red tape BS that the Gov't could throw at him.

nonetheless HE WON and now he is well known among the legal circles. He not only gained fame but also prestige and respect from his fellows.

My point is simple: fighting lonely and desperate battles, for the betterment of the public at large, may nonetheless give you fame, fortune, and RESPECT.

View user profile

trina


Arresto Mayor
b_9904 wrote:
Ponente wrote:I am a new lawyer, having passed the 2007 BAR. When I was still a law student, I was very excited and looking forward to bright things and challenges. One week after our signing, I immediately engaged in the private practice in a local law office. I consider myself very lucky to have case/s everyday. My work day starts at around 8:30 in the moring and usually it ends at the same time in the evening. After several months of private practice, it dawned unto me the extent of corruption in this country. I feel disappointed, to be honest. Most of my companeros say that it is still best to engage in the practice of law whether in private or in the govt, but for the moment, I think otherwise. I realized that being a lawyer here is a matter of survival, it is either you go along with the trend of coruption, otherwise you are fighting a lonely and desperate battle. Nakaka awa ang sistema dito sa atin.

As of this moment, I intend to try the corporate world. Maybe I will find more comfort in mercantile and taxation laws. Good luck to me in finding a new job.

respectfully soliciting your views/reactions to herein posted topic. Thanks.

Atty. Oposa fought a lot of lonely battles but nonetheless won two landmark cases in environmental law, namely: Oposa v. Factoran, Jr. and MMDA v. Citizen of Manila Bay.

He lost many of the public interest cases he filed but he kept on fighting.

He gave up his commercial law practice so that he could fight for his cause.

He gave up the royalty in one of his book so that people could read about the dire situation of our environment.

He fought against corruption, apathy, and a lot of red tape BS that the Gov't could throw at him.

nonetheless HE WON and now he is well known among the legal circles. He not only gained fame but also prestige and respect from his fellows.

My point is simple: fighting lonely and desperate battles, for the betterment of the public at large, may nonetheless give you fame, fortune, and RESPECT.
very inspiring.

thanks b9904 hurray

View user profile

b_9904


Prision Correccional
^your welcome...

:-)

View user profile

jarod


Arresto Menor
Ponente!

Do not be discouraged panero, just maintain and keep your idealism and integrity.
Evil succeeds when good men do nothing. I've been in the government for almost 9 years and I've seen my share of corruption. At times, frustration and disappointments set in but there are still few good men in this country, and they can still inspire you to stand up and fight for what is good and right.

View user profile

prettylaw


Arresto Mayor
thank you b9904 and jarod. Its nice to hear those words of encouragement especially to aspiring lawyers like me

View user profile

b_9904


Prision Correccional
^you are welcome :-)

View user profile

Ponente


Arresto Menor
Thanks everyone for thr commments. I must admit that I am disappointed but I am not losing hope. My point is that corruption is being considered as a norm in this country, which I must disagree. Yes, its a dog eat dog system that is being practice here, but I believe it boils down to the question if you want to become part of it.

I, for one may be thinking of looking for another option but that does not mean , I have lost faith in this country. I believe there are alot of ways to serve our country. I must admit in one way or another that I have played a part in that infamous corrupt practices. I am just appalled at the extent of this practice. I must emphasized, it shoul not be made a norm in our society. I have seen the eyes of poor people seeking justice and until now I am haunted by it.

When I posted this topic, many of you, have posted their positive reactions. I greatly appreciate it.

At the end of the day,I see hope in us.

View user profile

jarod


Arresto Menor
Timely and stirring appeal
A LAW EACH DAY (Keeps Trouble Away) By Jose C. Sison Updated March 23, 2009 12:00 AM


Several weeks ago, I received in my e-mail a letter addressed to “all Filipinos everywhere” written by a brave woman apparently disgruntled but not disheartened by the turn of events in our country. With the current happenings that seem to be getting worse, I feel it is timely to reproduce portions of what she wrote as follows:

“I used to think that corruption and criminality in the Philippines were caused by poverty? But recent events tell me this isn’t true? It is one thing to see people turn into drug addicts, prostitutes, thieves and murderers because of hunger and poverty, but what excuse do these rich, educated people have that could possibly explain their bizarre behavior?? And to think I was so relieved when petty snatchers got caught and locked away in jail because I never fully realized that the big time thieves were out there, making laws and running our country? Can it get any worse than this?

Every night, I come home and am compelled to turn on my TV to watch the latest turn of events. I am mesmerized by these characters? They are not men? They are caricatures of men — too unreal to be believable and too bad to be real? To see these ‘honorable” crooks lambast each other, call each one names, look each other in the eye and accuse the other of committing the very same crimes that they themselves are guilty of, is so comical and appalling that I don’t know whether to laugh or cry. It is entertainment at its worst!

It makes me wonder where on earth these people came from and what kind of upbringing they had to make them act the way they do for the entire world to see. It makes me wonder what kind of schools they went to, what kind of teachers they had, what kind of environment would produce such creatures who can lie, cheat and steal from an already impoverished people they had vowed to serve. It makes me wonder what their children and grandchildren think of them, and if they are breeding a whole new generation of improved Filipino crooks and liars with maybe a tad more style but equally negligible conscience. Heaven forbid!

I am an ordinary citizen and taxpayer. I am blessed to have a job that pays for my needs and those of my family’s, even though 30% of my earnings go to the nation’s coffers. Just like others in my lot, I have complained time and again because our government could not provide enough of the basic services that I expect and deserve; rutty roads, poor educational system, poor social services, poor health services, poor everything? But I have always thought that was what all third world countries were all about, and my complaints never amounted to anything more.

And then this? Scandalous government deals? Plundering presidents pointing fingers? Senators associated with crooks? Congressmen who accept bribes? Big time lawyers on the side of injustice? ….And it’s all about money, money, money that the average Juan de la Cruz could not even imagine in his dreams. Is it any wonder why our few remaining decent and hardworking citizens are leaving to go to work in other countries?

They say the few stupid ones like me who remain in the Philippines are no longer capable of showing disgusts. I don’t agree. Many like me feel anger at the brazenness of men we call our leaders, embarrassment to share the same nationality with them, frustration for our nation and helplessness at my own ineffectuality. It is not that I won’t make a stand. It is just that I am afraid my actions would only be futile. After all, these monsters are capable of anything. They can hurt me and my family? They already have though I may not yet feel it.

But I am writing this because I need to do something concrete. I need to let others know that ordinary citizens like me do not remain lukewarm to issues that would later affect me and my children. I want to make it known that there are also Filipinos who dream of something better for the Philippines. I want them to know that my country is not filled with crooks in every corner, and that there are citizens left who believe in decency, fairness, a right to speak, a right to voice out ideas, a right to tell the people we have trusted to lead us that they have abused their power and that it is time for them to step down. I refuse to let this country go to hell because it is the only country I call mine and it is my responsibility to make sure I have done what I could for it.

Those of us who do not have the wealth, power or position it needs to battle the evil crime lords in the government can summon the power of good. We can pray. We can do this with our families every night. We can offer petitions every time we celebrate Mass. We can ask others to pray too, including relatives and friends here and overseas. And we can offer sacrifices along with our petitions, just so we get the message to Him of our desperation in ridding our nation of these vermin. After all they cannot be more powerful than God.

(To be continued)

View user profile

freedomcom


Arresto Menor
nasususlat kung walang pagod kumilos ang kasamaan wala ring pagod kikilos ang kabutihan. naususlat, ang mga masama nanadya ng paggawa ng masama upang ikaganti sa mabubuti, ngunit ang mabubuti mananadya,magpapatuloy ng paggawa ng tama upang ipang ibig sa masasama at ipangligtas sa kanila. so lets rock en roll

View user profile

zabri


Arresto Menor
i'm a 2007 bar passer too and like you, i also joined the private practice. yes i've seen how money and politics work in our judicial system. it is frustrating, exhausting, and lonely especially that i'm all alone in my practice (hindi ako nag apply sa mga law firms)

i remember venting my problems to a panyero. i told him that i'm so upset that my case was not decided on the merits but by "politics" and "palakasan". so aside from the difficulty of honing my trial techniques/ skills,i also encountered the ugly truth about the practice.
a court employee even advised me--"gugulang ka rin atty." (haist! sad, they are really comfortable with the dirty practices).

despite all of these, i am still in private practice and at the same time employed in a private corporation. it's hard balancing the two jobs but my corporate job gives me refuge everytime i get frustrated in the system, instead of feeling agitated i keep myself busy with the corporate affairs.

i did not leave the practice because i love being in litigation and it is very fulfilling to help others esp. when you win your case without doing unethical actions. (iba pa rin yung natututo ka sa sarili mong paraan)

my advise to you is just keep on striving to be a good lawyer, don't be discourage of the system, and just beleive in yourself that you can create good changes. Very Happy

View user profile

LeeRain


Arresto Menor
I think otherwise. I realized that being a lawyer here is a matter of survival, it is either you go along with the trend of coruption, otherwise you are fighting a lonely and desperate battle

View user profile

Sponsored content


View previous topic View next topic Back to top  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum